DIY as a legacy of the Open Source movement

Douglas Rushkoff gives some very interesting theories about what the open source movement has given to the culture at large and the DIY movement in general. Very interesting ideas which I will be pursuing by grabbing several of his older books and getting his latest book as soon as it hits the shelves.

 

It is the real legacy of the open source movement—misunderstood even by many of its participants as solely a way to develop computer operating systems, and underestimated in its potential impact by even its staunchest opponents. As I’ve come to see it, the deeper cultural agenda is based on three far-reaching assumptions:

1. The systems by which we live are inventions and conventions.

2. The codes underlying those systems can be learned and rewritten.

3. This process best takes place collaboratively.

It’s those same three stages of renaissance we’ve been looking at all along: moving from passivity to gaining a perspective and then to attaining the power of authorship. Finally, the desire to acquire and spend social currency fuels a spirit of collaboration. We play the game by the rules, we learn enough codes to cheat, and ultimately rewrite the game and share our creations with others.

:: Douglas Rushkoff – Weblog ::

 

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About Dewayne Mikkelson

A technogeek in life and a webdeveloper by profession. Blogging is my favorite sport.
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